tblaberge:

It’s not easy for me to be weak, to not be able to have the answers for what is going on with my heart, mind, and body. This is why I must daily come before Christ, offering what little I have, so that God in His perfect glory, can bring me into His perfect rest.

-T.B. LaBerge

(via pureblyss)

"As we piled back onto the buses, throughout the weekend, that is the refrain – ‘we are unafraid to die’ — that stuck with many of us, that let us know something is different.

But it is different for different reasons than I might have imagined. What does it mean to be ‘unafraid to die’ in order to bring about change? As those words echoed in my mind, on the bus ride home, I was reminded of Notorious B.I.G., the slain rapper whose debut album ‘Ready to Die’ turns 20 years old this month.

Some of the Ferguson riders are 20 years old. They were birthed in the crucible of the Tupac-Biggie moment, the height of 20th century black nihilism. The same year that Biggie dropped ‘Ready to Die,’ Cornel West published the classic ‘Race Matters.’ In the first chapter, ‘Nihilism in Black America,’ he argued, ‘the major enemy of black survival in America has been and is neither oppression nor exploitation but rather the nihilistic threat — that is loss of hope and absence of meaning. … The self-fulfilling prophecy of the nihilistic threat is that without hope there can be no future, that without meaning there can be no struggle.’

Mike Brown’s death has brought new meaning to local black struggle. His death has come to mean something more, something greater than his life might have been taken to mean, as a poor young black man from a working-class suburb. His death, and officer Darren Wilson’s callous disregard for his life, has made the precariousness of black life visible for a whole new generation of black youth. The precariousness has been made visible and it has been deemed unacceptable – by both the old and the young. One of the riders, a 10-year-old girl from Los Angeles, told us in a church service on Sunday morning, ‘I am here because I am worried about my life. I’m only 10 years old. I should not have to be worried.’"

— Dr. Brittney Cooper, "I am not afraid to die": Why America will never be the same post-Ferguson (via ethiopienne)

(via daniellemertina)

(Source: talented10th, via crissle)

Unless you’re a white, Christian, heterosexual male making over 50K in America…

You’re oppressed.

pretty-period:

Congratulations to Abena Appiah, Miss Universe Ghana 2014The first Miss Universe Ghana to rock her natural hair in a long, long, long, long time!
#PrettyPeriod

pretty-period:

Congratulations to Abena Appiah, Miss Universe Ghana 2014
The first Miss Universe Ghana to rock her natural hair in a long, long, long, long time!

#PrettyPeriod

(via neekwuzhere)

blackfashion:

pallet-town-julie-brown:

kudos to mtv for spreading this message tho

Turn the fuck up MTV

(Source: lookdifferentmtv, via thechanelmuse)

unapologetakallyme:

thoughtz-and-dreamz:

lmao I’m listening to International Players Anthem, & this goes with it.


Lmao, I can hear his voice… “Baby bruh! Ow!” 😂😂😂😂

unapologetakallyme:

thoughtz-and-dreamz:

lmao I’m listening to International Players Anthem, & this goes with it.

Lmao, I can hear his voice… “Baby bruh! Ow!” 😂😂😂😂

(via complexsimpliccity)

(Source: devoutfashion)

Inspired by Carefree Black Girls Cabinet by KBthinks I made this because her post started off great but then it turned into one hell of a trash ass post once it caught attention so I made this one and added a few more to the post

(Source: blogofcollage, via blueklectic)